Diabetes Podcast Week

This summer, Diabetes Mine ran a story about the resurgence of diabetes podcasts. I had just launched Diabetes Connections and I was excited to read about the others in our community. As I read, I thought, wouldn’t it be cool to do something together?

dpodcastweekstockI always enjoy Diabetes Blog Week, so it seemed like a natural fit to create Diabetes Podcast Week. This first effort will help put the spotlight on a terrific charity.  I’m teaming up with the Partnership for Diabetes Change (P4DC), to spread the word about the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign. Let’s use the power of podcasting to do some good.

During the week of February 1, 2016, podcasters who sign up will include information about Spare a Rose in their shows and on their websites. They’ll ask listeners to learn more and to consider making a donation. All the episodes won’t be all about Spare a Rose; I’m encouraging the hosts to do their usual, great shows, just with this specific information included.

spare2The idea behind Spare a Rose, Save a Child is simple: buy one less rose this Valentine’s Day and donate the value of that flower to children with diabetes. Donations go to Life for a Child, an International Diabetes Federation program which provides life-saving diabetes supplies, medication, and education that children in developing countries need to stay alive.

“The most impressive thing I’ve learned from my involvement in the Spare a Rose campaign is the giving power of the community,” says Scott Johnson, a founding member of P4DC.  “Everyone can identify with the emotional and financial needs of life with diabetes, and Spare a Rose offers an easy way for everyone to help.”

How can you help? If you’re a podcaster, please sign up by emailing me at DPodcastWeek@gmail.com. I’ll send you more details and make sure we’re all on the same page. Deadline to be part of the official list is January 12th. It doesn’t matter what type of diabetes you talk about, whether you’ve just released your first 5 minute recording or if you’re on episode 372 and top of the charts on iTunes. If you’re making internet radio, you focus on diabetes and you want to do good, please join us.

If you’re a listener, stand by. More information will be released once we have the podcasters signed up.

If you’re reading this and thinking, “That’s nice, what’s a podcast?” click here for some help.

That’s it! Stay tuned for more on #DPodcastWeek, coming February 1, 2016.

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Nine Years #Dfriends

The first weekend of December, 2006. The date was December 2, but I always have to look that up. I just remember that the phone call came on a Saturday morning. Benny was feeling better than he’d been in a few days, so when the woman said, “pack a bag and get to the hospital,” I asked her if it was really that urgent. Of course it was, so off we went.

Benny2006 2That was nine years ago. Benny was almost two, he is almost 11 now. So much has changed, but he’s still the same sweet, silly kid who will do anything for a laugh.

 

Diabetes isn’t really easier now. Perhaps it’s more routine, but every age brings new challenges. Finger sticks, pump inset changes and CGM insertions still hurt. Benny had his yearly blood draw this week and he came up with a nice idea. We’re calling it #Dfriends.

 

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Does your child have a stuffed animal that gives them comfort? Diabetes is a lot of poking and prodding and crud. Benny has always had a “friend” to help. When he was very little it was Elmo. He used to “test” Elmo, pretend to give him juice, give him a new inset and hug him afterwards. These days, Benny likes a white tiger. We snuck Tigey into the blood draw room in my giant purse. Benny says he knows a lot of almost 11-year-old boys might be embarrassed to admit they need this kind of help but, “I don’t care. It helps me feel okay. And if helps another kid feel okay, they should do it.”

Benny wants to see your #Dfriends. We just came up with this. There’s no prize, it’s nothing official, but I think it’ll be fun. Post a picture on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, wherever.

We’ll start (I’m StaceySimms on Instagram, this site has links to my other social media). Show us the stuffed animal or pet that your child likes to hold when something hurts or diabetes gets them down. Include your child in the picture if he or she says it’s okay (both of my kids are SO over being on mom’s social media feed).

Let’s see your #Dfriends

#Dfriends

 

 

 

Win Jerry the Bear!

This week on Diabetes Connections I’m talking to the inventors of Jerry the Bear, an amazing teaching toy that helps kids with type 1 diabetes or food allergies learn through play.  I’m excited to announce I’m giving away one Jerry the Bear!

Listen to the podcast to find out how Sproutel’s founders Hannah Chung and Aaron Horowitz continue to improve their award-winning and adorable product. They’ve even been honored by the White House. Then enter to win!

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Click here to enter the contest. Just fill out the form!

Contest begins 11/24/2015 and closes 12/8/2015. Entries accepted via this form. Shipping outside the U.S. voids the repair warranty on Jerry the Bear (please be aware if you enter and do not live in the USA). Winner chosen at random from all entries and may choose either expansion pack (type 1 diabetes or food allergies).  Jerry will ship in the summer of 2016 (this is the earliest available shipping date). Click here & scroll down for FAQ about this latest version of Jerry the Bear featured in our contest.

The Diabetes-Free Day

animaspingLike most parents of kids with diabetes, I worry about burnout. That’s why we tried something I call The Diabetes-Free Day.

New column up over at Animas: 

My friends who’ve been through the teen years talk about burnout and warn me about expecting him to do too much at a young age. We help a lot at home with site changes and BG checks when he wants. At the same time, I think he’d be insulted if I told him he couldn’t or shouldn’t take care of himself at school or a when he’s away from home…

When Benny came home (from non-d sleep-away camp) this year, I had a funny idea. He’d done an amazing job and only had a couple of bad lows and highs; overall he’d kept his blood sugar in a really good range. But I knew it was a lot of work and a lot of brain power. So I made him an offer, “How about a diabetes-free day?” I asked.

(click here to keep reading)