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Interesting blog prompt today from Diabetes Daily. They want our stories about social media burnout.

At this moment, I’m not really feeling the burn on social media, probably because I’m  starting to use it in a whole different way. I started my podcast, Diabetes Connections, a few weeks ago; I have additional Facebook and Twitter accounts to manage. The beginnings of things are always shiny and new, so it’s fun right now. I’m even using Facebook ads for the first time this week. It’s got me firing some cylinders I haven’t used before.

However, in my personal accounts, over the past year I’ve disengaged from a bunch of diabetes parenting Facebook groups.  I post and comment a lot less.  I love the support that social media brings. It’s helped me find my place in this community and I like to think it’s helping me help my son become more independent and confident in his diabetes management. But I also feel like there’s a lot of judging and comparing going on.

Parenting with diabetes is difficult, in part, because parenting is difficult. We all do this in our own way. What works for me may horrify you. Like those crazy energetic moms on Pinterest taking hours to create amazing school lunches. I make my kids’ lunches and they will never look like that. While DOC conversations are less about cutting sandwiches into fancy shapes, there still seems to be a competition over who can out-parent. Night checks, remote monitoring, what pump to use, what to do at school. These are all important topics for parents of kids with diabetes, but sometimes talking about them feels like wading into a minefield.

I’ve gotten a little fed up with the judgement and the “my way or the highway” crowd and this feeling that I’m not doing a good enough job. To that end, I’ve removed myself from a lot of groups and I avoid certain topics on my blog. I’m still happy to chime in with advice if someone asks, as long as they understand that works for me may not be best for them.

Honestly, I think so much of this comes from fear. It’s hard enough to think we might not measure up as parents – thinking we may not measure up as diabetes parents is terrifying, because we think our kids will pay the price. But we’re all just doing the best we can. We all love our kids and we all want what’s best for them.

For now, I’m going to keep to the few groups I’m in and concentrate on my real-life connections. When the social media burn gets to be a bit too much, a good in-person conversation (or a podcast interview!) brings me back to feeling connected, valued and heard. Things that can get easily lost in the noise online.